The Mighty Microgreen exists because of a statistic:

in the past 15 years, children have dropped their consumption of vegetables by 50%. We are dedicated to turning that statistic around.

The problem

As of 2022, 93% percent of children ages 1–18 consumed fewer vegetables than recommended (1), in most cases eating only a fraction of what is needed for optimal health. Only 2% of teenagers get enough vegetables in their diet. During the same time frame, obesity, mental illness, and other health issues among the young have increased.

Unhappy children with poor eating habits

The answer

Microgreens are up to 40% more nutritious than full-size vegetables. (3) They taste good yet they are easy to disguise within many tasty recipes. When kids grow their own microgreens and vegetable gardens, they are much more apt to eat those veggies. Win!

The Mighty Microgreen is unique- not only do we make it possible for you and your family to grow tiny veggies in your home in an economical and easy way, we inspire kids to expand their healthy food choices

One of the greatest gifts of mankind is the ability to choose.

This gift of free agency is a two-edged sword because we sometimes overlook the fact that every choice is connected to a consequence. The choice of what we put into our bodies is often short-sighted. What tastes good enters the mouth and “damn the consequences!” Changing eating styles can be difficult, especially once we have established eating patterns that are based on habits of the past. Although the best time to learn to eat healthily is when we are young, it is never too late! We here at The Mighty Microgreen have a mission- to help you understand dietary choices and to help you inspire good choices in your family.

Margo Clayson of The Mighty Microgreen

Margo Clayson, Founder of the Mighty Microgreen

Margo Clayson is the founder and team lead of The Mighty Microgreen. She is a mom, grandma, teacher, and entrepreneur. With a background in science, nutrition, and horticulture, she has grown veggies and other plants for over 50 years and started working with microgreens long before they were called ‘micro-greens’. Margo loves to travel, discover new things, teach both children and adults, grow all kinds of edible plants, fly her flock of white homing pigeons, and volunteer in her community.

Heather Danforth-Clayson of The Mighty Microgreen

Heather Danforth-Clayson (MA, Curriculum and Instruction) has spent nearly two decades as an educator, working with students and teachers from preschool to high school. She is nationally recognized for curriculum development and has presented to educators at numerous conferences around the country. She is particularly passionate about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) teaching and learning and has been recognized as an Exemplary STEM Educator by 100Kin10, an organization that seeks to increase the number and quality of STEM educators in the United States. She has also been honored with the Rosenthal Award (second place, 2017) for Innovation and Inspiration in Mathematics Teaching, presented annually by the National Museum of Mathematics. Heather is thrilled to be supporting The Mighty Microgreen’s efforts to advance children’s nutrition and science learning through joyful micro-gardening.

Daniel Clayson is an experienced software developer and entrepreneur. As a Technical Consultant at Autodesk and the co-founder and CEO of the Dabblefox platform, Daniel has developed software used at multiple Fortune 500 companies and educational institutions across the country. As the Mighty Microgreen’s technology lead and a health-conscious husband and father, he is pleased to help move The Mighty Microgreen Adventure out where it will influence not only his children but the many children and families in your community.

And yes, we are a family business whose goals are to help YOUR family grow microgreens- and understand why they are a fantastic choice for all generations.



Dietary recommendations are intended to be met based on dietary intake over long periods, as associations between diet and health result from habitual intake, not a single eating occasion or day of intake (2)

(1) https://epi.grants.cancer.gov/diet/usualintakes/national-data-usual-dietary-intakes-2007-to-2010.pdf

(2) https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_02/sr02_178.pdf